Other training opportunities | POGO

Other training opportunities

Open Calls for Shipboard Training

Visit the Ocean Training Partnership website for current shipboard training announcements. 

POGO Grants for workshop attendance

POGO sponsors young scientists from developing countries to attend scientific workshops adhoc. This is not a open call for travel grants but only applies to workshops specifically selected by POGO. Please check the Training & Education page regularly to see which workshops are supported by POGO.

Applications now open for 6th African Ocean Research Discovery Camp

The deadline for applications is 10 March 2019.

 

SCOR is pleased to announce the 6th course of the Regional Graduate Network in Oceanography (RGNO), a SCOR-supported cooperative research and capacity building initiative in southern Africa. The course will again be hosted by the University of Namibia's Sam Nujoma Marine Research Center in Henties Bay and Namibia's National Marine Information and Research Center in Swakopmund, and will take place between 28 April and 24 May 2019.

 

ICTP-CLIVAR Summer School on Oceanic Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems

The ICTP-CLIVAR Summer School on Oceanic Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems will be take place from 15-21 Jul 2019 at Trieste, Italy. 

 

This school will focus on coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics in upwelling systems, their biogeochemical and ecological processes, and their sensitivity to climate variability and change. 

 

The summer school is accepting applications until 15 April 2019. 

 

For full details and to apply, visit:

POGO Workshop on Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence in Biological Oceanographic Observations

Description

The past two decades have seen rapid advances in technology available to oceanographers seeking to study and manage marine ecosystems. Relatively cheap, compact computers and digital storage have allowed scientists to collect big, complex datasets. Cruises now regularly return to port with terabytes of data, high temporal resolution coastal time series contain billions of measurements, and water samples are parsed into millions of DNA sequences. These information rich datasets have grown so large that analysis with traditional methods has become untenable.

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